Posts Tagged ‘eurozone’

IATA has lowered its profit expectations from its global airline earnings in 2012 to $3.5 billion, 28.6% less than its last prediction, stating its concerns of a net loss of $8.3 billion if the Eurozone crisis continues to worsen and global GDO growth falls.

IATA’s previous forecast was released in September, in which they revealed their expectations of a $4.9 billion profit next year. The airline industry leaders represents more than 200 airlines around the world, including Asia, Europe and the Americas.

“The biggest risk facing airline profitability over the next year is the economic turmoil that would result from a failure of governments to resolve the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis. Such an outcome could lead to losses of over $8 billion- the largest since the 2008 financial crisis,” said Tony Tyler of IATA.

“This admittedly worst-case- but by no means unimaginable- scenario should serve as a wake up call to governments around the world,” he continued. “Government policies need to recognize aviation’s vital contribution to the health of the economy.”

He added that even the best case scenario for next year “is for a new margin of just 0.6% on revenues of $618 billion. But the industry is really moving at two speeds, with highly taxed European carriers headed into the red.”

Asian shares saw a dramatic increase following this weekend’s meetings in Europe, which resulted in “good progress.” According to European finance ministers, the Eurozone plans to boost its $610 billion rescue fund in an effort to draw investors and convince markets that it is indeed capable of protecting floundering countries such as Italy and Greece.

Few real details were released after the meetings, though. Investors have continued to focus on the yen, which has reached a record post-war high of 75.78 against the dollar. As a result, Japanese finance minister Jun Azumi has called for “decisive steps” to slow the currency’s dramatic rise, amid concerns that the yen will hinder the country’s export market.

Hong Kong and Shanghai both climbed this week as well, as improved manufacturing data was released from China, but Europe’s crisis does not seem to have slowed. Debates are still common as the Eurozone struggles to find a solution for the economic issue without further provoking its richer nations, such as Germany, who have placed their limit after repeatedly bailing out the region’s weaker members.

“The mood of trading is generally optimistic that Eurozone policy makers will announce significant measures on Wednesday to bolster the bailout fund and resolve Greece’s debt crisis, while also supporting the region’s banks,” explained Stan Shamu of IG Markets.

Tokyo stocks fell on Wednesday and the Nikkei stock index lost 0.84 percent, as tensions arose over geopolitical strife over conflagrations in Korean and the instability of the eurozone after Ireland’s debt-rating cut stressed investor feelings.

Standard & Poor’s downgrading of Ireland’s long-term debt caused fear of a domino effect in the eurozone and lowered investor confidence.
Adding to investor uneasiness are increasing tensions in Korean after artillery exchanges between the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK).

Japan’s nearness to the conflagrations lead to share dumping in the Japanese market, according to some analysts.

Tokyo Electron fell 2.1 %, down to 5,150 yen. Mitsubishi Corp. lost 1.4 percent to 2,115 yen. Mitsui & Co. dropped 0.8 percent to 1, 330 yen.