Earth Hour Good for Japanese Morale

Earth Hour took place on 26 March between 8 30 and 9 30 pm.  It is a time when people around the globe turn off their lights and make a “commitment to actions that go beyond the hour.”  According to the Earth Hour website, this year “our thoughts are with the people of Japan during this incredibly challenging and sad time for their country.”

Origins of Earth Hour

Earth Hour first emerged in Australia in 2007 as a way of conserving the world’s energy and natural resources which are depleting way too quickly.  This was a great first step but was also then leading to a climate change and is today a global event which is “being observed in more than 134 countries and territories,” coordinated by the World Wide Fund.

Delhi Saves 296 MW Power

Earth Hour was most effective in India.  During the hour more than a thousand individuals came together to dance away to loud rock numbers from the Indian band Euphoria, in complete darkness!  Lights weren’t needed for the energy to spike.  No one stayed home.  From toddlers to seniors, everyone joined in total cohesion to save electricity during the 8 30 to 9 30 Earth Hour.  According to DU student  Sharmishtha Chatterjee, “…it was very wise on WWF’s part to organize an event like this, where everyone was invited,” since otherwise many people would have just stayed home alone and ignored the event – and the idea – and not turned off their electricity.  Indeed, according to Sheila Dixit Delhi Chief Minister, “the city plunged in darkness for a brighter tomorrow….[with the] hope that Earth Hour sensitizes each one of us for making the shift to a better lifestyle.”

There’s Always One Party Pooper

Unfortunately at any party there’s usually one party pooper.  At this celebration it was clearly Toronto.  Millions of people from 134 countries — from Delhi, India to Heidelberg, Germany — switched off their lights and televisions for the fifth annual Earth Hour on Saturday night to show their support for action on climate change, but Toronto witnessed a measly 5 per cent power drop during the event, marking just 50 percent of the country’s achievements last year.  Nonetheless, it’s still seen as a “success” in the country.

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